Activities, Canadian History, Goldrush, History, Klondike, Teaching Resources, Yukon

Cremation of Sam McGee

Robert Service’s ballad about Sam McGee, the miner who could never get warm, was published with great popularity in 1907, and has been a classic every since. Explain to your kids that the story is an embellished and humorous look at the hardship of the Yukon gold rush.

The real Sam McGee was a successful miner from Ontario, who struck it rich and, in 1909, retired to fruit farming in Summerland, BC. He never met Robert Service, who used his name after McGee made a deposit at the bank in Whitehorse where Robert Service was a teller. On his 2nd return to the Yukon, Sam McGee found his fellow passengers on the steam-ship were buying “genuine ashes of Sam McGee”! It’s not everyday one can buy one’s own cremated ashes! McGee’s cabin is now part of the exhibit at the MacBride Musum in Whitehorse, YK.

Hear a marvelous rendition of the ballad at this link.

Activities, Canadian History, Geography, History, Homeschool conference

Order Ahead – Conferences

There’s nothing like a homeschool conference to get close-up and personal with books that will make or break your next school year. You know your children better than anyone and what materials will engage them most.

You can get the most out of a conference by shopping online ahead of time, knowing exactly what you want to view, and even ordering ahead to just pick up and go without the shipping costs.  On our site, to order online, choose the Pay by Cheque option and add a note in the comments field as you are finalizing your order, about where you want to pick it up. (If you miss the comments field, just send an instructional email to info@donnaward.net.) We’ll subtract the shipping added and have your order ready for pick-up.

Just make sure you really intend to pick up though. Look forward to seeing you.

Conference Schedule 2018

Black History, Canadian History, History, Teaching Resources

Black History Month

Mathieu Da Costa may have been the first black freeman, acting as an interpreter, to visit Canada with de Mons & Champlain, celebrated in this Canada Postage Stamp.

People of African descent have had a part in shaping Canada’s identity. Some Loyalists who came during and after the American Revolution and settled in East Coast provinces, were black. As far back as the War of 1812, Black Canadian soldiers defended our country and made sacrifices. Black History Month is a focused time to learn about the important contribution of Black Canadians in the history of our country, and to celebrate with Black Canadians the role and importance their ancestors played in the fabric of our society. See videos and resources here to make this easy for you to talk about Black History Month with your students.